Florida Can Do Something About Criminal Illegals

Florida Can Do Something About Criminal Illegals

“I’m fighting to keep illegal immigrants off the street,” said the phone call from Bob White (the former Pasco County Sheriff not the bird).  “This is a difficult fight. And Richard Corcoran is the representative I need in Tallahassee to get a law passed in Florida similar to the one in Arizona.”

The 2010 message, paid for and approved by Corcoran’s campaign, led voters to believe the newly minted speaker would take action.  White told the Tampa Bay Times that he’s… felt strongly about the issue and the candidate.  According to the Tampa Bay Times, White even sought counsel from Corcoran on illegal immigration the same month he made robocalls to voters urging them to support Corcoran’s bid for state House because he would be tough on the issue.

Here we are six years later, Corcoran at the peak of power, and we still have no law on the books. Will 2017 be the year Corcoran & Negron finally make good on their promise to their constituents?

At least President Joe Negron tried to co-sponsored a bill to protect our communities from criminal illegal aliens. (Those of us insiders know this was a complete ruse, by the way)

He should take it one step further.

The Florida Constitution gives our legislature powerful tools to deal with criminal aliens, but the namby-pamby milksop for members tiptoeing around Tallahassee are more worried about patting themselves on the back for making some lobbyists file some extra forms.  

Who has the guts to sponsor a bill to escheat property owned by aliens ineligible for citizenship?  

Article 1, Section 2 of Florida’s Constitution specifically allows the legislature to regulate or prohibit “the ownership, inheritance, disposition and possession of real property by aliens ineligible for citizenship…”

Right now there are two categories of aliens ineligible for citizenship. If you have ever been convicted of one of the following, you are permanently denied U.S. citizenship:

  • murder, or
  • an aggravated felony (if the conviction was after November 29, 1990).

We already take someone’s house if it’s used as a crack den, then why aren’t we rooting our murders and violent felons from our neighborhood and putting the land to good use? Even handing it over to favored big business for “economic development” or just auctioning it off to the highest American bidder would be better than a criminals nest.

We are talking about the worst of the worst.

You talked a good game during the election about “criminal illegals” and it’s time to prove you’re not just a self-serving politician who doesn’t care about the folks back home

Worried about what voters will say? Back in 2008, this specific provision was up for repeal and a majority of voters wanted to keep it!

A No Vote for Rejection Means Yes I Support Keeping the Provision

A “No” Vote for Rejection Means “Yes I Support Keeping the Provision”

You have the support, you made the promises…what are you waiting for?